Speakers

Session moderators

Dina Temple-Raston, National Public Radio (read bio) // Session 1: Global Hate Speech
Provost Lauren Robel, Indiana University (read bio) // Session 2: The New Congress and U.S. Foreign Policy
Fred H. Cate, Indiana University (read bio) // Session 3: Cyber, Technology, and Global Threats
Marie Harf, Fox News Channel (read bio) // Session 4: Presidential Politics and Foreign Policy
Dave Lawler, Axios (read bio) // Session 5: Next Generation International Development
Carol Giacomo, The New York Times (read bio) // Session 6: Back to the Future? Averting a New Nuclear Arms Race

Session panelists

Noah Arjomand, Indiana University (read bio)
Tiffany Benjamin, Eli Lilly & Co (read bio)
Derek Chollet, The German Marshall Fund (read bio)
Amb. Lee Feinstein (Ret.), Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University (read bio)
Agnieszka Graff, American Studies Center, University of Warsaw (read bio)
Rep. Lee Hamilton (Ret.), Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University (read bio)
Grant Harris, Harris Africa Partners, LLC (read bio)
Adam Hitchcock, Sovereign Infrastructure Group (read bio)
Juliette Kayyem, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (read bio)
Lucas Kello, Oxford University (read bio)
Harold Koh, Yale Law School (read bio)
Christopher A. Kojm, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington Universit (read bio)
Roberto Salinas León, Mexico Business Forum (read bio)
Mayor James D. Lienhoop, City of Columbus, IN (read bio)
Danny Lopez , Governor’s Workforce Cabinet, State of Indiana (read bio)
Sen. Richard G. Lugar (Ret.), The Lugar Center (read bio)
Brian P. McKeon, Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement, University of Pennsylvania (read bio)
Sec. Ernest J. Moniz, Nuclear Threat Initiative (read bio)
W. Gyude Moore, Center for Global Development (read bio)
Suzanne Nossel, PEN America (read bio)
Sally Smith, The Nexus Fund (read bio)
Jake Sullivan, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (read bio)
Neera Tanden, Center for American Progress (read bio

Bios

Noah Arjomand, Indiana University

Noah Arjomand is Mark Helmke Postdoctoral Scholar in Global Media, Development, and Democracy at the Center for International Media Assistance and Indiana University’s School of Global and International Studies. He studied sociology (PhD) at Columbia University and, before that, public and international affairs (AB) at Princeton University.

Noah’s research focuses on cross-cultural communication and its mediators, particularly in the Turkish- and Persian-speaking world. His PhD dissertation, currently under revision into a book manuscript, is an ethnography on the roles and strategies of “fixers” who broker communication between foreign journalists and sources in Turkey, demonstrating how they shape the news and manage their ambivalent position between cultural and moral worlds.

Noah is also interested in media production, including documentary film and photography and the use of audiovisual and interactive media to communicate scholarly and policy-relevant ideas. He has published mixed media visual/written essays on Afghanistan and Turkey and done multimedia work for music and theater companies Morningside Opera, Wet Ink Ensemble, and Siren Baroque. Noah’s first feature-length documentary, which deals with assistive communication technology and its role in the life of an ALS patient (his mother), is currently in post-production.

Tiffany Benjamin, Eli Lilly & Company

Tiffany Benjamin is Senior Director, Corporate Responsibility and Global Health Programs. She also serves President of the Eli Lilly and Company Foundation. In her Senior Director role, she manages the company’s civic engagement, corporate social responsibility efforts, disaster relief efforts, and global health initiatives. Prior to that, she was Senior Director, Litigation and Legal Compliance, Assistant General Counsel, Assistant Corporate Secretary and she served as the company’s anti-corruption counsel and legal counsel on the company’s privileged internal investigation process.

Prior to joining Lilly, Ms. Benjamin served as Senior Investigative Counsel for the Democratic Staff of U.S. House of Representatives Energy and Commerce Committee, working on investigations into national matters including the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the Wal-Mart Mexico bribery allegations, the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak, and the Solyndra loan guarantee investigation. Before joining the Committee, she worked as an associate in the D.C. office of King and Spalding, as a member of its Special Matters team, handling white collar matters and government investigations. Ms. Benjamin has a law degree from Harvard Law School and an undergraduate degree from Indiana University.

Vice President Fred H. Cate, Indiana University

Fred H. Cate is Vice President for Research, Distinguished Professor, and C. Ben Dutton Professor of Law at Indiana University. He specializes in information security and privacy law and has testified before numerous congressional committees and served on many advisory groups for companies and governmental and international organizations. He served as the founding director of IU's Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research from 2003 to 2014, where he is now a senior fellow. He is also a senior policy advisor to the Centre for Information Policy Leadership and one of the founding editors of the Oxford University Press journal, International Data Privacy Law. He is the author of more than 200 articles and books, including most recently Bulk Collection: Systematic Government Access to Private-Sector Data (with Jim Dempsey) published in 2017 by Oxford University Press. Professor Cate attended Oxford University and received his J.D. and his A.B. with Honors and Distinction from Stanford University. A former Senator and President of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, he is a fellow of Phi Beta Kappa and the American Bar Foundation, and an elected member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the American Law Institute.


Derek Chollet, The German Marshall Fund

Derek Chollet is Executive Vice President and Senior Advisor for security and defense policy at The German Marshall Fund of the United States. He served in senior positions during the Obama administration at the White House, State Department, and Pentagon, most recently as the U.S. assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs. He is a contributing editor to Foreign Policy, where he co-edits "Shadow Government," and is a regular contributor to Defense One. He is also an advisor to Beacon Global Strategies, an Adjunct Senior Research Scholar at Columbia University’s Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, and a Visiting Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perry World House. His most recent book is The Long Game: How Obama Defied Washington and Redefined America’s Role in the World.


Amb. Lee Feinstein, Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies

Lee Feinstein is founding Dean and Professor of International Studies at the Hamilton Lugar School at Indiana University Bloomington. Prior to joining HLS, he served as U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Poland (2009-2012). Before that he was a senior fellow and deputy director of studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, specializing in U.S. foreign policy, international institutions, and national security affairs. He served on the Presidential Transition Team for President Obama and as Principal Deputy Director and member of the Policy Planning Staff at the Department of State from 1994-2001. Feinstein serves on the board of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, a presidentially appointed position, and is a member of the Museum’s Executive Council. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and serves on the Board of the Kosciusko Foundation, on the Advisory Council of the Indiana University Center for Global Health, and on the Indiana Advisory Committee of the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition. He is the author of Means to an End: U.S. Interest and the International Criminal Court (with Tod Lindberg), and a regular commentator on international affairs.

Carol Giacomo, New York Times

Carol Giacomo, an expert in foreign and defense issues, joined The New York Times Editorial Board in 2007. At The Times, she writes editorials arguing the paper’s position on the leading national security challenges of the day, including the nuclear threats posed by North Korea and Iran; the wars in Afghanistan, Syria and Iraq; the rising threats from Russia and China; and the impact of America’s declining international leadership under President Trump.

Before that, she was the diplomatic correspondent for Reuters in Washington, where she covered foreign policy for the international wire service for more than two decades. During her time at Reuters, she traveled over 1 million miles to more than 100 countries with eight secretaries of state and various other senior U.S. officials.

In 2018, she won the Arthur Ross Media Award for commentary on foreign affairs from the American Academy of Diplomacy, an organization of 150 plus former diplomats. Ms. Giacomo is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She was a Ferris professor of journalism at Princeton University in 2013. Giacomo often speaks publicly at academic institutions, think tanks and on media shows. Born and raised in Connecticut, she holds a B.A. in English Literature from Regis College, Weston, Mass.


Agnieszka Graff, American Studies Center, University of Warsaw

Agnieszka Graff is an associate professor at the American Studies Center, University of Warsaw; she teaches US culture, literature and film, African American studies and gender studies. She has authored several books of feminist essays: Świat bez kobiet (World without Women, 2001); Rykoszetem (Stray Bullets – Gender, Sexuality and Nation, 2008), Magma (The Quagmire Effect, 2010), Matka Feministka (Mother and Feminist, 2014). Her articles on gender in Polish and US culture have appeared in collected volumes and academic journals including Public Culture, Feminist Studies and Signs. She is the co-editor of an up-coming issue of Signs "Gender and the Rise of the Global Right." Her ongoing research is on connections between the anti-gender mobilization and right-wing populism.

Graff is an activist and media commentator as well as a scholar: a founding member of Women’s 8th of March Alliance, co-organizer and speaker of Congress of Polish Women, collaborator of Batory Foundation, Heinrich Boell Foundation, Political Critique. She writes for major journals and newspapers, including Gazeta Wyborcza and has authored introductions to Polish editions of Betty Friedan’s Feminine Mystique (2012), Susan Faludi’s Backlash (2013) and Audre Lorde’s Sister Outsider (2015).


Rep. Lee H. Hamilton

Lee H. Hamilton is one of the nation's foremost experts on Congress and representative democracy. Hamilton founded the Center on Congress at Indiana University in 1999 and served as its director until 2015, after serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, where he represented Indiana from 1965-1999. He also served as president and director of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C., from 1999-2010. He is a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2015), and of the University Medal (IU, 2018).

Hamilton currently serves as a distinguished scholar in the Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies and as a professor of practice in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University.

A leading figure on foreign policy, intelligence, and national security, Hamilton served as vice chairman of the 9/11 Commission and co-chairman of the bipartisan Iraq Study Group. Until recently, he served as co-chair of the U.S. Department of Energy's Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future with General Brent Scowcroft, as a member of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board and Homeland Security Advisory Board.

Continuing to play a leading role in public affairs, Hamilton has been at the center of efforts to address some of our nation’s highest profile homeland security and foreign policy challenges. He currently serves as co-chair of the Task Force to Prevent Extremism in Fragile States with Gov. Tom Kean.

Among his published works are How Congress Works and Why You Should Care (2004), Strengthening Congress (2009), and Congress, Presidents, and American Politics (2016). He writes twice-monthly commentaries about Congress and what individuals can do to make representative democracy work better. He is a frequent contributor to the national press.


Marie Harf, Fox News

Marie Harf is a national security communications and policy strategist who has worked on critical issues including the Iran nuclear negotiations and the Syrian refugee crisis.

Previously, Harf was senior advisor to and press spokesperson for Chuck Hagel during his successful confirmation to be Secretary of Defense.

During the 2012 election, Harf was Associate Policy Director responsible for all national security and foreign policy issues on President Barack Obama’s re-election campaign. Harf developed and implemented the campaign’s national security policy and communications strategies and was a member of President Obama’s debate preparation team.

Prior to joining President Obama’s campaign, Harf served as the Central Intelligence Agency’s Media Spokesperson, where she crafted the CIA’s media strategy on a wide range of sensitive national security and intelligence topics.

Harf began her career in the CIA’s Directorate of Intelligence, where she was an analyst on Middle East leadership issues. She produced finished intelligence products—including for the President’s Daily Brief—on top foreign policy priorities and authored in-depth assessments of foreign leaders.

Harf received her Master’s degree in Foreign Affairs from the University of Virginia, where her thesis evaluated the prospects for continued regime stability in Saudi Arabia. She graduated with honors from Indiana University, earning a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science with concentrations in Jewish Studies and Russian and Eastern European Studies. Ms. Harf is a native of Granville, Ohio.

Grant Harris, Harris Africa Partners, LLC

Grant Harris is CEO of Harris Africa Partners LLC and advises companies, universities, and non-profits on working in Africa. From 2011 to 2015, Harris served as the principal advisor to President Barack Obama on sub-Saharan Africa, serving as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for African Affairs at the White House. In this role, Harris conceived of the historic U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, which generated $37 billion in new commitments to support trade, investment, and development across Africa. Harris also initiated President Obama’s Doing Business in Africa Campaign; launched the President’s Young African Leaders Initiative; and was the primary architect of the U.S. Strategy Toward Sub-Saharan Africa. Prior to this position, Harris was Deputy Chief of Staff and Counselor to Susan Rice, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. Previously, Harris was an associate at the law firm of Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP. Prior to that, Harris served in the African Affairs Directorate at the White House under President Bill Clinton and, before that, in the U.S. Mission to the United Nations under Ambassador Richard Holbrooke. Harris holds a law degree from Yale Law School, a Master’s in Public Affairs from Princeton University, and a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley.


Adam Hitchcock, Sovereign Infrastructure Group

Adam Hitchcock is an investor and advisor whose career has spanned finance and politics. He is Co-Founder and Managing Partner of Sovereign Infrastructure Group, a multi-strategy global infrastructure investment business. He is Managing Partner of Patch Capital Partners, a residential real estate financial institution. He serves as a Senior Advisor at Resolute Consulting, a national public affairs firm.

Previously, he was a Managing Director at Guggenheim Partners, reporting to the executive chairman. Before entering finance, Adam worked in political campaigns and government. He served in the Obama White House in the Office of the Chief of Staff and the Council of Economic Advisers. Before joining the Obama White House, Adam was on the Obama-Biden White House Transition Project and the Obama 2008 presidential campaign. Previously, he worked for Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley.

Adam is a member of the Dean’s Council at Indiana University’s Hamilton Lugar School of Global and International Studies, is on the Board of Advisors at the Truman National Security Project, serves on the Studies Committee at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and is a member of the Atlantic Council. He was a lecturer at the University of Chicago for four years teaching a class on global macro.

He is involved with the non-profit community in Chicago serving on the board of Urban Initiatives and leadership council of A Better Chicago.

Juliette Kayyem, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Juliette Kayyem currently serves as the Belfer Lecturer in International Security at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government where she is Faculty Director of the Homeland Security Project. She is the founder of Kayyem Solutions, LLC, as well as the CEO of Zemcar, a lifestyle company focused on connecting busy parents with qualified drivers to solve their family’s transportation needs. She is also an on-air national security analyst for CNN.

Kayyem spent her government service managing complex policy initiatives and organizing government responses to major crises in both state and federal government. She was President Obama's Assistant Secretary for Intergovernmental Affairs at the Department of Homeland Security. Before that, she was Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick’s homeland security advisor, and has served as a member of the National Commission on Terrorism, a legal advisor to US Attorney General Janet Reno, and a trial attorney and counselor in the Civil Rights Division at the Justice Department.

A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School, Juliette is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Global Cyber Alliance, the Trilateral Commission and served on the DHS Secretary's Homeland Security Advisory Committee. Her newest book, Security Mom: My Life Protecting the Home and the Homeland, was published in 2016.


Lucas Kello, Oxford University

Lucas Kello is Senior Lecturer in International Relations at Oxford University. He serves as Director of the Centre for Technology and Global Affairs, a major research initiative on the impact of modern technology on international relations, government, and society. He is also co-Director of the interdisciplinary Centre for Doctoral Training in Cyber Security at Oxford's Department of Computer Science. His recent publications include The Virtual Weapon and International Order (Yale University Press), "The Meaning of the Cyber Revolution: Perils to Theory and Statecraft" in International Security, and "Security" in The Oxford Companion to International Relations (Oxford University Press).


Harold Hongju Koh, Yale Law School

Harold Hongju Koh is Sterling Professor of International Law at Yale Law School. He returned to Yale Law School in January 2013 after serving for nearly four years as the 22nd Legal Adviser of the U.S. Department of State. Professor Koh is one of the country’s leading experts in public and private international law, national security law, and human rights. He first began teaching at Yale Law School in 1985 and served as its fifteenth Dean from 2004 until 2009. Professor Koh has received numerous honorary degrees and awards for his human rights work. He has authored or co-authored eight books, published more than 200 articles, testified regularly before Congress, and litigated numerous cases involving international law issues in both U.S. and international tribunals.

Koh holds a B.A. degree from Harvard College and B.A. and M.A. degrees from Oxford University, where he was a Marshall Scholar. He earned his J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he was Developments Editor of the Harvard Law Review. Before coming to Yale, he served as a law clerk for Justice Harry A. Blackmun of the United States Supreme Court and Judge Malcolm Richard Wilkey of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, worked as an attorney in private practice in Washington, and served as an Attorney-Adviser for the Office of Legal Counsel, U.S. Department of Justice.


Christopher A. Kojm, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University

Christopher A. Kojm is a Professor of Practice at the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University. He also serves as the Director of the Elliott School's Leadership, Ethics and Practice Initiative. He re-joined the School in 2014 after serving as Chairman of the National Intelligence Council (2009-14). He also directs the School's US Foreign Policy Summer Program and previously directed its mid-career Master's program. He taught previously at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs (2004-07).

In government, Kojm served as a staffer on the House Foreign Affairs Committee from 1984-98 under Rep. Lee H. Hamilton, and as a deputy assistant secretary of state in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research (1998-2003). He also served as deputy director of the 9/11 Commission (2003-04) under Chairman Thomas H. Kean and Vice Chair Lee H. Hamilton, and later (2004-05) as president of the 9/11 Public Discourse Project, the Commission’s follow-on public education organization. He also served as a Senior Advisor to the Iraq Study Group (2006) under Co-Chairs James A. Baker III and Lee H. Hamilton.


Dave Lawler, Axios

Dave Lawler is an associate editor and author of Axios World newsletter. Dave joined Axios after four years with the London Daily Telegraph, most recently as the newspaper’s Washington Correspondent. He played a central part in the Telegraph’s 2016 election coverage, contributing news stories, analysis and dispatches from the campaign trail. In addition to U.S. Politics, Dave provided on the ground reporting for major events including terrorist attacks in San Bernardino and Orlando.


Roberto Salinas León, Mexico Business Forum

Roberto Salinas León is President of the Mexico Business Forum, where he works on assorted projects of policy analysis, media, investment advisory and economic consultancy. He is also currently the Director of the Center for Latin America of Atlas Network. He has published more than 2,000 editorials (English and Spanish) on public policy topics; occasional columnist in The Wall Street Journal, The Journal of Commerce, Investor’s Business Daily, Barrons, and many others. He was a weekly economic analyst in the news show "Hechos," TV Azteca, 1994-2004. He is now occasional commentator for CNN, CNN Latinamerica, CNCB, Reuters, National Public Radio, BBC Radio, and others. He has testified before the U.S. Congress on three occasions—on NAFTA and free trade, structural reform in Mexico, and monetary and exchange rate policy.


Mayor Jim Lienhoop, City of Columbus, Indiana

James D. Lienhoop is the 37th Mayor of the City of Columbus, taking office on January 1, 2016. Although newly elected as Mayor, he has served City government since 2006, beginning as an interim member of City Council to replace a council member who was called to active duty. He was elected to his own term as Columbus City Councilman, at-large representative, in 2012. Lienhoop has been heavily involved in the Columbus community, having served on the board, usually in an officer capacity, of numerous not-for-profit endeavors.

Prior to being elected Mayor, Lienhoop was employed at Blue and Co. from 1986-2015. He started as manager of the Seymour, Indiana tax department and became manager of the Columbus, Indiana office in 1989. He also served as Director in charge of Blue’s Southern Indiana Offices and, for six years, Chairman of the firm.

Danny Lopez, Governor’s Workforce Cabinet

Danny Lopez currently serves as Chairman of the newly-created Governor’s Workforce Cabinet under Indiana Governor Eric Holcomb. Since the beginning of the Holcomb administration last January, he has served as the Governor's Deputy Chief of Staff and previously was then-Lieutenant Governor Holcomb’s Chief of Staff under the previous administration.

Lopez began his work in politics, advocacy, and government in 2004 as managing partner of Capitol Gains, Corp., a political consulting and Spanish-language media relations firm. Since moving to Indiana in 2008, Lopez has held the positions State Director, US Senator Dan Coats; Special Assistant, Indiana Governor Mike Pence; Deputy Director, State of Indiana Civil Rights Commission; Executive Director, State of Indiana Commission on Hispanic Affairs and Director of Legislation/Communications, City of Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan.

Lopez is engaged with a number of private and public organizations serving a true cross-section of Hoosiers. He was named to the Indianapolis Business Journal’s prestigious Forty Under 40 list for 2016 and has previously served on a number of boards, including the State of Indiana Charter School Board and the City of Bloomington Economic Development Commission.

Sen. Richard G. Lugar

Richard G. Lugar is president of The Lugar Center, a non-profit organization focusing on global food security, WMD non-proliferation, aid effectiveness, and bipartisan governance. Lugar also serves as a professor of practice and distinguished scholar at the School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University. Lugar volunteered for the U.S. Navy in 1957, ultimately serving as an intelligence briefer for Admiral Arleigh Burke, Chief of Naval Operations. A fifth generation Hoosier, Lugar left the U.S. Senate as the longest serving member of Congress in Indiana history. Before his election to the Senate, Lugar helped manage the family’s food machinery manufacturing business in Indianapolis, served on the Indianapolis Board of School Commissioners, and served two terms as mayor of Indianapolis.

During his six terms in the Senate, Lugar exercised leadership on critical issues such as food security, nuclear non-proliferation, energy independence, and free trade. In 1991, he forged a bipartisan partnership with then-Senate Armed Services Chairman Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) to destroy weapons of mass destruction in the former Soviet Union. To date, the Nunn-Lugar program has deactivated more than 7,600 nuclear warheads that were once aimed at the United States.


Brian P. McKeon, Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement, University of Pennsylvania

Brian P. McKeon is a senior director at the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement at the University of Pennsylvania, a foreign policy institute based in Washington, DC. Prior to joining the Center, he served for three decades in all three branches of the federal government. He worked for over 20 years in the U.S. Senate, all for Senator Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (D-DE), in his Senate office and then as his chief counsel for 12 years at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He served in the Obama administration for all eight years in various national security positions, including Deputy National Security Adviser to Vice President Biden, Executive Secretary and Chief of Staff for the National Security Council, and Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy. McKeon also worked for a year as a law clerk to U.S. District Judge Robert G. Doumar in the Eastern District of Virginia. In addition to his government service, he worked on the Clinton/Gore re-election campaign in 1996. He received a BA from the University of Notre Dame, and a JD from the Georgetown University Law Center.


Sec. Ernest J. Moniz, Nuclear Threat Initiative

Ernest J. Moniz, former U.S. Secretary of Energy, is chief executive officer and co-chair of the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization working to prevent catastrophic attacks with weapons of mass destruction and disruption (WMDD)—nuclear, biological, radiological, chemical, and cyber.

Moniz served as the thirteenth U.S. Secretary of Energy from 2013 to 2017. As Secretary, he advanced energy technology innovation, nuclear security and strategic stability, cutting-edge capabilities for the American scientific research community, and environmental stewardship.

Moniz served on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty from 1973 until 2013 and is now the Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems emeritus and Special Advisor to the MIT President. He also is a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Harvard Belfer Center and president and CEO of Energy Futures Initiative.


W. Gyude Moore, Center for Global Development

W. Gyude Moore is a visiting fellow at the Center for Global Development. He previously served as Liberia’s Minister of Public Works with oversight over the construction and maintenance of public infrastructure from December 2014 to January 2018. Prior to that role, Moore served as Deputy Chief of Staff to President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf and Head of the President’s Delivery Unit (PDU). As Head of the PDU, his team monitored progress and drove delivery of the Public Sector Investment Program of Liberia—a program of over $1 billion in road, power, port infrastructure, and social programs in Liberia after the civil war.

At CGD, Moore's research focus is around financing infrastructure in Africa and the changing landscape of development finance on the continent. His research tracks the channels of private sources of finance, the rise of China and its expanding role in Africa, and Africa’s response to these changes. He holds a BS in Political Science from Berea College and an MS in Foreign Service from Georgetown University.


Suzanne Nossel, PEN America

Suzanne Nossel is Chief Executive Officer at PEN America. Since joining the organization in 2013, she has overseen a doubling of the organization's staff and budget and the strengthening and expansion of membership, research and advocacy, and public programs. Prior to joining PEN America, she served as the Chief Operating Officer of Human Rights Watch and as Executive Director of Amnesty International USA. She has served in the Obama Administration as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for International Organizations, leading US engagement in the UN and multilateral institutions on human right issues, and in the Clinton Administration as Deputy to the US Ambassador for UN Management and Reform.

Nossel coined the term "Smart Power," which was the title of a 2004 article she published in Foreign Affairs Magazine and later became the theme of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's tenure in office. She is a featured columnist for Foreign Policy magazine and has published op-eds in The New York Times, Washington Post, and LA Times, as well as scholarly articles in Foreign Affairs, Dissent, and Democracy, among others. Nossel serves on the Board of Directors of the Tides Foundation. She is a former senior fellow at the Century Foundation, the Center for American Progress, and the Council on Foreign Relations. Nossel is a magna cum laude graduate of both Harvard College and Harvard Law School.


Provost Lauren Robel, Indiana University

Lauren Robel has served as Provost and Executive Vice President of Indiana University Bloomington since 2012. During her tenure, she has overseen the founding of the Center for Rural Engagement and its Sustaining Hoosier Communities initiative, as well as the organization of IU Corps, an umbrella connecting service-related courses, internships, research, and volunteerism. Robel has also overseen the reorganization of a number of units across campus, as well as the creation of several schools. Previously, she served as dean of the Maurer School of Law, where she was a founding board member of the Law School Survey of Student Engagement.


Jennifer Rubin

Jennifer Rubin writes reported opinion for The Washington Post. She covers politics and policy, foreign and domestic, and provides insight into the conservative movement, the Republican and Democratic parties, and threats to Western democracies.

Rubin, who is also an MSNBC contributor, came to The Post after three years with Commentary magazine. Prior to her career in journalism, Rubin practiced labor law for two decades, an experience that informs and enriches her work.

Jake Sullivan, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Jake Sullivan is the Montgomery Fellow at Dartmouth College and a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He served in the Obama administration as Deputy Assistant to the President and National Security Adviser to Vice President Biden, as well as Director of Policy Planning at the State Department and Deputy Chief of Staff to Secretary Clinton. He was the policy director on Secretary Clinton's 2016 campaign.


Sally Smith, The Nexus Fund

Sally Smith is the founder and executive director of The Nexus Fund, whose mission is to build and strengthen the global community to end mass atrocities. The organization works in countries with a high risk of mass atrocities, but where there is still time for prevention, providing critical resources to locals on the front lines who are often overlooked by traditional donors, as well as thought leadership on how we can make "never again" a reality. Since 2016, Nexus also combats hate and division in the U.S.

Smith's virtual reality film, Behind the Fence, about the Rohingya genocide in Myanmar, won the 2017 SXSW Grand Jury Prize, was nominated for an Emmy, and was screened at the United Nations. Smith has written for Crooked.com, The Washington Post, and has been a guest on Pod Save the World and CNN International. Since 2003, she has worked for numerous campaigns, foundations and nonprofit organizations, including Obama for America 2007-2008.


Neera Tanden, Center for American Progress

Neera Tanden is the president and CEO of the Center for American Progress and the CEO of the Center for American Progress Action Fund, where she focuses on how both organizations can fulfill their missions to expand opportunity for all Americans.

Before leading American Progress, Tanden was the organization's chief operating officer. She previously served as senior adviser for health reform at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In that role, she developed policies around reform and worked with Congress and stakeholders on particular provisions of President Barack Obama's signature legislative achievement, the Affordable Care Act. Prior to that, Tanden was the director of domestic policy for the Obama-Biden presidential campaign and was policy director for Hillary Clinton's first presidential campaign, where she managed all domestic policy proposals.

Before the 2008 presidential campaign, Tanden served as legislative director in Sen. Clinton's office and deputy campaign manager and issues director for Clinton's 2000 Senate campaign. She began her career as an associate director for domestic policy in former President Bill Clinton's White House and senior policy adviser to the first lady. She has appeared on numerous news programs and been included in Elle magazine's "Women in Washington Power List" and Politico Magazine's "Politico 50," an annual list of the top thinkers, doers, and visionaries in American politics.


Dina Temple-Raston, National Public Radio

Dina Temple-Raston is a special correspondant who develops programming focused on the news of the day and issues of our time. Previously, Temple-Raston served as NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent, reporting from all over the world. In that role, Temple-Raston covered deadly terror attacks in the U.S. and abroad, the evolution of ISIS, and radicalization. While on leave from NPR, Dina independently executive produced and hosted a non-NPR podcast about adolescent decision making called What Were You Thinking.

In 2014, she completed a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University where as the first Murrey Marder Nieman Fellow in Watchdog Journalism she studied the intersection of Big Data and intelligence. Prior to joining NPR in 2007, Temple-Raston was a longtime foreign correspondent for Bloomberg News in Asia and served as Bloomberg's White House correspondent during the Clinton Administration. She has written four books, including The Jihad Next Door: Rough Justice in the Age of Terror, about the Lackawanna Six terrorism case. She is a frequent contributor to the PBS Newshour, a regular reviewer of national security books for the Washington Post Book World, and also contributes to the New Yorker, The Atlantic, New York Magazine, Radiolab, the TLS, and the Columbia Journalism Review, among others.

She is a graduate of Northwestern University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

Dina Temple-Raston, National Public Radio

Dina Temple-Raston is a special correspondant who develops programming focused on the news of the day and issues of our time. Previously, Temple-Raston served as NPR's counter-terrorism correspondent, reporting from all over the world. In that role, Temple-Raston covered deadly terror attacks in the U.S. and abroad, the evolution of ISIS, and radicalization. While on leave from NPR, Dina independently executive produced and hosted a non-NPR podcast about adolescent decision making called What Were You Thinking.

In 2014, she completed a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University where as the first Murrey Marder Nieman Fellow in Watchdog Journalism she studied the intersection of Big Data and intelligence. Prior to joining NPR in 2007, Temple-Raston was a longtime foreign correspondent for Bloomberg News in Asia and served as Bloomberg's White House correspondent during the Clinton Administration. She has written four books, including The Jihad Next Door: Rough Justice in the Age of Terror, about the Lackawanna Six terrorism case. She is a frequent contributor to the PBS Newshour, a regular reviewer of national security books for the Washington Post Book World, and also contributes to the New Yorker, The Atlantic, New York Magazine, Radiolab, the TLS, and the Columbia Journalism Review, among others.

She is a graduate of Northwestern University and Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism.

Past guests

Michael J. Abramowitz is president of Freedom House, a non-governmental organization that seeks to promote democratic change through research, advocacy and action. Before joining Freedom House in February 2017, he was director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Levine Institute for Holocaust Education, which oversees the museum’s education and exhibition programs. He previously led the museum’s genocide prevention efforts. Abramowitz had a long career in journalism, serving in a variety of roles at The Washington Post, including national editor and White House correspondent.  He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, former Marshall Memorial Fellow at the German Marshall Fund, former media fellow at the Hoover Institution, and a board member of the National Security Archive.

Asaad Alsaleh is  assistant  professor  of  Arabic  Literature  and  Cultural Studies in the Department  of  Near  Eastern  Languages and Cultures, Indiana  University.  His  research examines  personal  narratives  in  Arabic literature,  particularly autobiography,  dealing  with issues  related  to identity and displacement. His interest in narratives  demonstrating the intersection of Arabic literature and political culture resulted in the publication of his book, Voices of the Arab Spring: Personal Stories from the Arab Revolutions (2015).

Alyssa Ayres is senior fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and author of Our Time Has Come: How India is Making Its Place in the World (2018). Ayres served in the Obama administration as deputy assistant secretary of state for South Asia from 2010 to 2013, providing policy direction for four U.S. embassies and four consulates across a dynamic region of 1.3 billion people. Ayres was founding director of the India and South Asia practice at McLarty Associates, the Washington-based international strategic advisory firm, from 2008 to 2010. She was project director for the CFR-sponsored Independent Task Force on U.S.-India Relations in 2015, has co-edited three books on India and Indian foreign policy, and authored the 2009 book about nationalism, culture, and politics in Pakistan, Speaking Like a State, which received the American Institute of Pakistan Studies Book Prize for 2011–2012.  

Dan Balz is chief correspondent at The Washington Post. He joined the Post in 1978 and has covered politics throughout his career. He has authored four books, including two New York Times bestsellers. In addition to regular appearances on PBS’s Washington Week, Balz is a frequent guest on Sunday morning talk shows and other public affairs programs. U.S. Congressman Lee Hamilton, Distinguished Scholar in IU’s School of Global and International Studies will present Balz with the Lee H. Hamilton Public Service Fellowship. Balz’s talk is co-sponsored by the Media School, the Indiana Center on Representative Government and the Office of the Vice Provost for Research.

Christine Barbour teaches in Indiana University’s Department of Political Science, of which she is also a three time alumna and where she is also the internship director.  She is the co-author of three American politics textbooks and two Indiana-based cookbooks. She was active in starting the farm-to-table, Slow Food movement in Bloomington and has been a food columnist for the Bloomington Herald Times and, for the last ten years, Bloom magazine. 

Matthew Barzun served as U.S. ambassador to the United Kingdom from August 2013 to January 2017.  He served as national finance chair for former President Barack Obama’s re-election campaign in 2011 and 2012.  From August 2009 to May 2011, he served as U.S. ambassador to Sweden.  In 2008, he volunteered for then-Senator Barack Obama’s presidential election campaign, leading the effort to conduct supporter-driven small-dollar fundraisers.  From 2004 to 2008, Mr. Barzun was a private investor in a number of internet start-ups including MedTrackAlert, which he co-founded.  He joined CNET Networks in 1993 as its fourth employee and held various management positions during his 11 years with the company, including chief strategy officer. 

Sergio Berensztein is a political analyst based in Buenos Aires, where he runs a consultancy that works with public and private sector leaders to assess political and regulatory risks in uncertain environments, focusing on Argentina with a broad Latin American perspective. He has served as an advisor to multiple international organizations including the Corporación Andina de Fomento (CAF), the Inter American Development Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations Development Program, and the World Bank. Berensztein was a professor at Universidad Torcuato Di Tella from 1997 to 2017 and has been a visiting professor at Princeton, Georgetown, and Duke Universities. Currently, he is the Director of the Institute of Behavioral Sciences and Public Policy at the Instituto de Neurologia Cognitiva (INECO). He has written more than 50 publications on political reform, institutional development, and political economy. Berensztein is a columnist for the newspaper La Nacion and the co-host of a daily radio show -- “Vuelo de Regreso” [Return Flight] -- on FM Milenium 106.7. His forthcoming book focuses on the impact of 9/11, the Great Recession, and recent technological advances shaping the political landscape in both developed and developing countries. 

James F. Collins is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and former director of its Russia and Eurasia Program.  He is an expert on the former Soviet Union, its successor states, and the Middle East. Collins was the U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation from 1997 to 2001. Prior to joining the Carnegie Endowment in 2007, he served as senior adviser at the public law and policy practice group at Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, LLP.  Collins served as ambassador-at-large and special adviser to the secretary of state for the newly independent states in the mid-1990s and as deputy chief of mission and chargé d’affaires at the U.S. embassy in Moscow from 1990 to 1993. In addition to three diplomatic postings in Moscow, he also held positions at the U.S. embassy in Amman, Jordan; the consulate general in Izmir, Turkey; and the Department of State and White House in Washington.

Collins is the recipient of the Secretary of State’s Award for Distinguished Service; the Department of State’s Distinguished Honor Award; the Secretary of State’s Award for Career Achievement; the Department of Defense Medal for Distinguished Public Service; and the NASA Medal for Distinguished Service.  He has been active on the boards of nonprofit organizations concerned with U.S. foreign policy and U.S. relations with Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia. He has served as a member of the board of the U.S.-Russia Foundation, the U.S.-Russia Business Council, the American Academy of Diplomacy, the Open World Leadership Center, and American Councils for International Education.  Before joining the State Department, Collins taught Russian and European history, American government, and economics at the U.S. Naval Academy.

Gebisa Ejeta is distinguished professor of plant breeding and genetics and international agriculture, and is executive director of the Center for Global Food Security at Purdue University. Ejeta has had the honor of serving at the highest level of science and policy advisory for several international development and U.S. government agencies, including as special advisor to the USAID Administrator Dr. Rajiv Shah, as science envoy of the U.S. State Department, and as a member of the U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki Moon’s Scientific Advisory Board.

Ejeta currently serves on the boards of the Global Crop Diversity Trust, the Chicago Council for Global Affairs’ Global Food and Agriculture Program, the National Academy of Sciences Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, the International Water Management Institute, and on the U.S. Government Board for International Food and Agricultural Development. A 2009 World Food Prize laureate and recipient of a national medal of honor from the President of Ethiopia, Ejeta is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, fellow of the American Society of Agronomy, fellow of the Crop Science Society of America, and fellow of the African Academy of Sciences.

Jon Eldon recently returned from three years of working within an international NGO in West Africa to complete his PhD at the University of California - Santa Cruz, where he studied agricultural ecology and soil science in the context of rural development. His research focuses on farmer adaptation and agro-ecosystem management, with an emphasis on collaborative research methods in complex agricultural systems. With his recent work in Senegal and The Gambia, he secured support from the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa, USAID, and Australia Aid to conduct over 1000 farmer field trials that tested alternative crop management practices across a socially and spatially heterogeneous landscape. He has also worked in semi-subsistence agriculture in the South Pacific and highly commercialized production in California and Oregon. He is currently a visiting scholar at Indiana University at the Ostrom Workshop and will be joining the School of Public and Environmental Affairs in the fall.

Rebecca Erbelding worked as an archivist and curator at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum from 2003-2015, and since 2015, has been a historian for the museum's upcoming exhibition, Americans and the Holocaust, opening in April 2018. Her first book, Rescue Board: The Untold Story of America's Efforts to Save the Jews of Europe, will be published in April 2018. Her work has previously been featured in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The New Yorker. Her 2007 discovery of the personal photo album of Karl Hoecker, the adjutant to the final commandant of the Auschwitz concentration camp, has been featured on The History Channel and the National Geographic channel.

Lee Feinstein is founding dean and professor of international studies at the School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University Bloomington. Prior to joining SGIS, he served as U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Poland (2009-2012). Before that he was a senior fellow and deputy director of studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, specializing in U.S. foreign policy, international institutions and national security affairs. He served on the Presidential Transition Team for President Obama and as principal deputy director and member of the Policy Planning Staff at the Department of State from 1994-2001. Feinstein serves on the board of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, a presidentially appointed position, and is a member of the Museum’s Executive Council. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and serves on the Board of the Kosciusko Foundation, on the Advisory Council of the Indiana University Center for Global Health, and on the Indiana Advisory Committee of the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition. He is the author of Means to an End: U.S. Interest and the International Criminal Court (2009), with Tod Lindberg, and a regular commentator on international affairs.

Karen Freeman-Wilson is the mayor of Gary, Indiana.  Elected in 2011, Freeman-Wilson is the first woman to lead the steel city and the first African-American female mayor in the state.  A Gary native, Freeman-Wilson has served her state and hometown in a number of capacities.  As the twice-elected Gary City Judge, she helped pioneer the drug court movement in Indiana. During her tenure as Indiana Attorney General, Freeman-Wilson championed the rights of youth, seniors, and nursing home patients, and worked to combat gas price gouging and to ensure that tobacco settlement dollars were directed towards smoking cessation and health care. During her tenure as executive director of the Indiana Civil Rights Commission, the state was one of the first to pass legislation comparable to the American with Disabilities Act.

Freeman-Wise has served as the CEO of the National Association of Drug Court Professionals and executive director of the National Drug Court Institute, based in Washington, D.C. Under her leadership, the NADCP became the premier organizational advocate for drug treatment in the judicial arena, and the number of drug courts in the U.S. doubled to 1700.  After being named one of the “Top 100 To Watch” by the National Democratic Leadership Council, Freeman-Wilson was asked to address the 2000 National Democratic Convention in Los Angeles. 

Lee H. Hamilton is one of the nation’s foremost experts on Congress and representative democracy. Hamilton founded the Center on Congress at Indiana University in 1999 and served as its director until 2015, after serving in the U.S. House of Representatives, where he represented Indiana from 1965-1999. He also served as president and director of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington, D.C., from 1999-2010. He is a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom (2015). Hamilton currently serves as a distinguished scholar in the School of Global and International Studies and as a professor of practice in the School of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University. A leading figure on foreign policy, intelligence, and national security, Hamilton served as vice chairman of the 9/11 Commission and co-chairman of the bipartisan Iraq Study Group. Until recently, he served as co-chair of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future with General Brent Scowcroft and as a member of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board.

Continuing to play a leading role in public affairs, Hamilton has been at the center of efforts to address some of our nation’s highest profile homeland security and foreign policy challenges. He is currently a member of the President’s Homeland Security Advisory Council. Among his published works are How Congress Works and Why You Should Care (2004), Strengthening Congress (2009), and Congress, Presidents, and American Politics (2016). He writes twice-monthly commentaries about Congress and what individuals can do to make representative democracy work better. He is a frequent contributor to the national press.

Marie Harf is a national security policy and communications strategist who has held a variety of senior roles in government and politics since arriving in Washington over a decade ago.  Harf currently serves as a fellow in Georgetown University’s Institute of Politics and Public Service in the McCourt School of Public Policy. She is also a Fox News contributor, providing on-air national security and political analysis across the network’s daytime and prime time programming. 

From 2013 until 2017, Harf was a key member of Secretary John Kerry’s team at the State Department, serving as his senior advisor for strategic communications and as the department’s deputy spokesperson. She led the Obama administration’s communications and outreach strategy on the Iran nuclear negotiations and helped manage the successful effort to secure support for the deal from Congress. Harf ran all national security and foreign policy issues during President Barack Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign. She began her career at the Central Intelligence Agency, first as an analyst on Middle East leadership issues and later as its media spokesperson.

Jeffrey C. Isaac is James H. Rudy Professor of Political Science at Indiana University, Bloomington. He served as Editor in Chief of Perspectives on Politics, a flagship journal of the American Political Science Association, from 2009-2017, and in 2017 was awarded APSA’s Frank J. Goodnow Award for Distinguished Public Service to the profession for his work. He has published four books, edited two anthologies, and published over 75 articles and essays. His book Democracy in Dark Times (Cornell University Press, 1998) is published in Romanian as Democratia in Vremuri Intunecate (Bucharest: Polirom Press, 2000). He is a Contributing Editor of Dissent magazine, and also a Contributing Editor at Public Seminar, where he publishes regularly on current events, and also writes a weekly column on music and politics called Blue Monday. Public Seminar Books, a new digital publishing venture of the New School, will be publishing his book, Against Trump: Notes from Year One, in 2018.

James Keith has become one of the US government’s top experts on China during his 31-year career as a US diplomat, serving as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for China, National Security Council Director for China, Consul General in Hong Kong, and as a Political Officer in the US Embassy in Beijing. He also has broad experience in Asia outside of China. From 2007 to 2010 he was the US Ambassador to Malaysia. He was previously posted in Seoul and Jakarta, as well as serving as NSC Director for Southeast Asia. Ambassador Keith grew up across Asia, living in Tokyo, Jakarta, Hong Kong, and Taipei and currently leads McLarty Associates’ Asia practice. He joined the US Foreign Service in 1980 and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and the American Academy of Diplomacy. 

Andrew C. Kuchins is a senior fellow and research professor at the Center for Eurasian, Russian, and East European Studies (CERES) in the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. He has previously held senior positions at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. He has also taught and held research positions at Stanford University, UC Berkeley, and the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. 
  
Kuchins is the author and editor of six books, including The Russia Balance Sheet (2009) with Anders Aslund, Russia after the Fall (2002), and more than 100 academic articles, book chapters, reports, and op-eds. He is currently working on a manuscript exploring lessons learned from the history of US-Russia relations. He regularly consults with U.S. government agencies and officials, foreign policymakers, and the business world about developments in Russia and Eurasia, and is frequently called upon for commentary and analysis by leading U.S. and foreign media.  

Maria Lipman is a Russian political analyst and commentator who is currently a visiting lecturer at the School of Global and International Studies. She is the editor of Counterpoint, an online journal published by the Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies at George Washington University, and was the editor-in-chief of Pro et Contra, a policy journal published by the Carnegie Moscow Center from 2003-2014. Before joining Carnegie Moscow Center, Lipman was co-founder and deputy editor of two Russian weekly magazines. From 2001-2011, Lipman wrote an op-ed column on Russian politics, media, and society for The Washington Post. She has contributed to a variety of Russian and U.S. publications; since 2012, she has written a blog for The New Yorker online. She has contributed to and co-edited several volumes on Russian politics and society, including The State of Russia: What Comes Next? (2015). Lipman is a frequent speaker on the international conference circuit and has been regularly featured as a Russia expert on a range of international broadcast media.

Richard G. Lugar is the president of The Lugar Center, a non-profit organization focusing on global food security, WMD non-proliferation, aid effectiveness, and bipartisan governance. Lugar also serves as a professor of practice and distinguished scholar at the School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University. Lugar volunteered for the U.S. Navy in 1957, ultimately serving as an intelligence briefer for Admiral Arleigh Burke, Chief of Naval Operations. A fifth generation Hoosier, Lugar left the U.S. Senate as the longest serving member of Congress in Indiana history. Before his election to the Senate, Lugar helped manage the family’s food machinery manufacturing business in Indianapolis, served on the Indianapolis Board of School Commissioners, and served two terms as mayor of Indianapolis.

During his six terms in the Senate, Lugar exercised leadership on critical issues such as food security, nuclear non-proliferation, energy independence, and free trade. In 1991, he forged a bipartisan partnership with then-Senate Armed Services Chairman Sam Nunn (D-Ga.) to destroy weapons of mass destruction in the former Soviet Union. To date, the Nunn-Lugar program has deactivated more than 7,600 nuclear warheads that were once aimed at the United States.

Michael A. McRobbie has served as president of Indiana University since 2007. He previously served as IU’s vice president for information technology and chief information officer, as vice president for research, and as interim provost and vice president for academic affairs for IU Bloomington. Under McRobbie’s leadership as president, IU has seen a major expansion in the size and quality of its student body, a reinvigoration of the global partnerships that support the university’s international academic programs, an extensive program of building with the renovation and construction of more than 100 major new buildings with a total value of more than $2 billion, and a large-scale academic restructuring of the university, with the establishment of ten new schools. A native of Australia, McRobbie received a Ph.D. from the Australian National University. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Jamie Merisotis is a globally recognized leader in philanthropy, education, and public policy.  Since 2008, he has served as president and CEO of Lumina Foundation, an independent, private foundation that is committed to making opportunities for learning beyond high school available to all.  He previously served as co-founder and president of the nonpartisan, Washington, D.C.-based Institute for Higher Education Policy, and as executive director of a bipartisan national commission on college affordability appointed by the President and congressional leaders. Merisotis is the author of the widely-acclaimed book America Needs Talent, named a Top 10 Business Book of 2016 by Booklist.

Merisotis is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. He is frequently sought after as a media commentator and contributor. His writing has appeared in The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, National Journal, Stanford Social Innovation Review, The Washington Monthly, Huffington Post, Politico, Roll Call and other media outlets.  His work includes extensive global experience as an adviser and consultant in southern Africa, the former Soviet Union, Europe, and other parts of the world. Additionally, Merisotis chairs the board of The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis, and holds leadership positions on the boards of his alma mater Bates College in Maine, the Council on Foundations in Washington, D.C., Anatolia College in Greece, and the U.K.-based European Access Network.

Blair Milo is the State of Indiana’s first Secretary for Career Connections and Talent, working to help the state fill an estimated one million job openings over the next ten years. Prior to her appointment to Governor Holcomb’s cabinet, Milo served as Mayor of La Porte, Indiana, after being first elected in 2011 and reelected in 2015.  During her administration, Milo prioritized economic development, sustainable infrastructure needs, and the encouragement of positive lifestyle choices. During her time in office, 1,100 new jobs and over $260M in new investment were created.  Milo serves on the State Workforce Innovation Council and has chaired the Career Counseling Task Force.  One of 25 elected women from across the country named to Governing magazine’s 2017 Women in Government Leadership network, Milo also serves on the Indiana Advisory Alliance for the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition and the Board of Governors for the Richard G. Lugar Excellence in Public Service Series.  Prior to her roles in public service, Secretary Milo served as a surface warfare officer in the U.S. Navy, completing two Persian Gulf deployments, as well as serving in Bahrain, Iraq, and at the Pentagon.  In July 2010, Milo transitioned from active to reserve duty. In 2017 she was named American Legion Military Person of the Year (Reserve Category) for the State of Indiana.

James T. Morris is the vice chairman of Pacers Sports & Entertainment. Morris was chief of staff to Indianapolis Mayor Richard G. Lugar from 1967-73 before joining the Lilly Endowment, serving as its president from 1984-88. From 1989-2002, he was also the chairman and chief executive officer for IWC Resources Corporation and Indianapolis Water Company. Before joining PS&E, Morris was the executive director for the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) where he led the world’s largest humanitarian agency. Morris has received 17 honorary degrees and Indiana University’s Distinguished Alumni Service Award. He has been a trustee and board chairman for both IU and Indiana State University, serves on the National Advisory Board for the Boy Scouts of America, and is treasurer of the United States Olympic Committee. Along with his service on a number of corporate boards, Morris is former chair and longtime member of the Riley Children’s Foundation Board of Governors.

Yascha Mounk is a lecturer on government at Harvard University and a senior fellow at New America. A columnist at Slate and the host of The Good Fight podcast, he is a leading expert on the rise of populism and the crisis of liberal democracy. His most recent book, The People vs. Democracy: Why Our Freedom Is in Danger and How to Save It (2018), shows why the public’s belief in democracy is wilting away in America, Western Europe, and beyond and the two core components of liberal democracy ― individual rights and the popular will ― are increasingly at war with each other. 

Samantha Power is the Anna Lindh Professor of the Practice of Global Leadership and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School. From 2013 to 2017 Power served as the 28th U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, as well as a member of President Obama’s cabinet. In this role, Power became the public face of U.S. opposition to Russian aggression in Ukraine and Syria, negotiated the toughest sanctions in a generation against North Korea, lobbied to secure the release of political prisoners, helped build new international law to cripple ISIL’s financial networks, and supported President Obama’s pathbreaking actions to end the Ebola crisis. From 2009 to 2013, Power served on the National Security Council as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights, where she focused on issues including atrocity prevention; UN reform; LGBT and women’s rights; the protection of religious minorities; and the prevention of human trafficking.

Power’s book, “A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide won the 2003 Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Power is also author of the New York Times bestseller Chasing the Flame: Sergio Vieira de Mello and the Fight to Save the World (2008) and the editor, with Derek Chollet, of The Unquiet American: Richard Holbrooke in the World (2011). She began her career as a journalist, reporting from places such as Bosnia, East Timor, Kosovo, Rwanda, Sudan, and Zimbabwe and has twice been named to Time Magazine’s “100 Most Influential People” list. Before joining the U.S. government, Power was the founding executive director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at the Kennedy School.

Lauren Robel has served as provost and executive vice president of Indiana University Bloomington since 2012. During her tenure as provost, she has overseen the founding of the new Center for Rural Engagement and its Sustaining Hoosier Communities initiative, as well as the organization of IU Corps, an umbrella for all of IU Bloomington’s service-related courses, internships, research, and volunteerism. She has directed the reorganization of a number of units across campus, such as the School of Informatics and Computing and the School of Public Health, as well as the creation of several new schools: the Media School, the School of Global and International Studies, and the School of Art, Architecture, and Design. Robel has also initiated a number of campus-wide programs, including the Center of Excellence for Women in Technology and the IU Bloomington Arts and Humanities Council. She is currently coordinating the multi-year IU Bloomington Bicentennial Strategic Plan, a series of initiatives designed to strengthen and reinvigorate the residential learning experience on the Bloomington campus leading up to IU’s bicentennial in 2020. Previously, Robel served as dean of the Maurer School of Law, where she was a founding board member of the Law School Survey of Student Engagement and the Val Nolan Professor of Law.

Eric Schwartz became president of Refugees International in June 2017 after a three-decade career focused on humanitarian and human rights issues. Between 2009 and 2011, he served as U.S. assistant secretary of state for population, refugees, and migration. As assistant secretary, he was credited with strengthening the State Department’s humanitarian advocacy around the world, initiating and implementing critical enhancements to the U.S. refugee resettlement program, and raising the profile of global migration issues in U.S. foreign policy. He was the senior human rights and humanitarian official at the National Security Council during the Clinton administration, managing humanitarian responses to crises in Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. He also served as the U.N. deputy special envoy for tsunami recovery after the 2004 Asian tsunami; as Washington director of Asia Watch (now the Asia Division of Human Rights Watch); and staff consultant to the House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asian and Pacific Affairs, among other positions in the U.S. government, at the U.N., and in the non-profit sector.  

Before joining Refugees International, Eric served a six-year term as dean of the Hubert H. Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. During much of that period, he also served on the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom and, ultimately, as the commission’s vice chair.  

Katie Simmons is associate director of research at Pew Research Center. She is an expert in survey methodology and conducts research on international public opinion on a variety of topics, including U.S. foreign policy, the global economy, democracy and terrorism. Simmons helps to coordinate the center-wide international research agenda and serves as a methodology consultant on all international projects at the center. She is also involved in all aspects of the research process, such as managing survey projects, developing questionnaires, analyzing data and writing reports. Prior to joining Pew Research Center, Simmons worked as a research analyst for non-profit clients at Belden Russonello Strategists. Simmons is an author of reports on the crisis in Ukraine, global economic conditions, life satisfaction and economic reform in Mexico. She speaks about findings from Pew Research Center studies to a variety of audiences, including government agencies, academic groups, and domestic and international media.

Ronald D. Vitiello is the acting deputy commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP).  He previously served as chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, responsible for its daily operations and assisting in planning and directing nationwide enforcement and administrative operations. He served as deputy chief of the U.S. Border Patrol from 2010 until July 2016, when he was promoted to the executive assistant commissioner of operations support at CBP.  Vitiello was chief patrol agent of the Swanton Sector in Vermont from 2005 until July 2007, when he was selected as a member of the Senior Executive Service and promoted to chief patrol agent of the Rio Grande Valley Sector in Texas. There, Vitiello was appointed as the lead U.S. CBP hurricane preparedness coordinator for the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Region VI. He was responsible for deploying personnel and resources to a national domestic incident site, representing the CBP commissioner as the lead field coordinator, and leading more than 12,000 CBP employees in Texas, New Mexico, Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana.

In his capacity as assistant chief at U.S. Border Patrol Headquarters from 2002-2005, Vitiello was one of the key contributors in the unification of CBP and the creation of the Department of Homeland Security.  Previous leadership positions include special operations supervisor at the Nogales Station in the Tucson Sector and assistant patrol agent in charge of the Nogales Station, as well as deputy assistant regional director for the Border Patrol at the Central Region Office in Dallas, Texas, where he oversaw the regional implementation of Operation Rio Grande.  Vitiello entered on duty with the Border Patrol in 1985 at the Laredo Station in the Laredo Sector, where he also served as a Supervisory Border Patrol Agent.  

Celeste Wallander is president and CEO of the U.S.-Russia Foundation. She served as special assistant to the President and senior director for Russia/Eurasia on the National Security Council (2013-2017), as the deputy assistant secretary of defense for Russia/Ukraine/Eurasia (2009 to July 2012), professor at American University (2009-2013), visiting professor at Georgetown University (2006-2008), director for Russia/Eurasia at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (2001-2006), senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations (2000- 2001), and professor of government at Harvard (1989-2000). She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Atlantic Council of the United States, and the International Institute for Strategic Studies.  Additionally, Wallander is the author of over 80 publications on European and Eurasian security issues, focused on Russian foreign and defense strategy.

John Kojiro Yasuda is assistant professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Indiana University‘s School of Global and International Studies (SGIS). He specializes in contemporary Chinese politics. Yasuda’s research includes the study of regulatory reform in developing countries, governance, and the political economy of East Asia.  His work has covered a range of regulatory sectors including food safety, aviation safety, environmental protection, and financial regulation. He has published articles in the Journal of Politics, Regulation & Governance, and The China Quarterly. His new book, On Feeding the Masses:  An Anatomy of Regulatory Failure in China (2017) examines the political roots of China‘s food safety crisis.

Todd Young has been United States Senator from Indiana since 2017, having served as United States Representative for Indiana’s 9th congressional district from 2011-2017. He currently serves on the Senate Committees on Foreign Relations; Health, Education, Labor & Pensions; Commerce, Science & Transportation; and Small Business and Entrepreneurship. Enlisting in the U.S. Navy after graduating from high school, Young was offered an appointment to the United States Naval Academy a year later. After graduation, Young accepted a commission in the U.S. Marine Corps, where he attained the rank of Captain. Young worked for the Heritage Foundation, as a legislative assistant for energy policy to Senator Richard Lugar, and at a family law firm in Paoli, Indiana before being elected to Congress.

Asma Afsaruddin is Professor of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures in the School of Global and International Studies at Indiana University. She is the author and editor of seven books, including most recently Contemporary Issues in Islam (Edinburgh University Press, 2015) and the award-winningStriving in the Path of God: Jihad and Martyrdom in Islamic Thought (Oxford University Press, 2015). Her research has been supported by the Guggenheim Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Asaad Al-Saleh is Assistant Professor of Arabic Literature and Cultural Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, Indiana University. His research examines personal narratives in Arabic literature, particularly autobiography, dealing with issues related to identity and displacement. His interest in narratives demonstrating the intersection of Arabic literature and political culture resulted in the publication of his book, Voices of the Arab Spring: Personal Stories from the Arab Revolutions(Columbia University Press, 2015).

Matthew Barzun was America’s ambassador to the UK from 2013-2017. Previously, he served as U.S. Ambassador to Sweden from 2009-2011. He was a pioneer in the early days of the internet, becoming the fourth employee of CNET Networks in 1993 and working there until 2004 in a variety of roles including Chief Strategy Officer and Executive Vice President. Before the President’s election in 2008, Barzun was among the fist to join Barack Obama’s National Finance Committee where he produced the first $25 per-person fundraiser and helped teach Obama University for campaign volunteers. President Obama selected him as National Finance Chair for his 2012 re-election campaign. Barzun has served on the boards of many non-profits focused on education, public policy, and interfaith relations.

David Bosco is Associate Professor at the School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University. He is author of books on the International Criminal Court and the U.N .Security Council, both published by Oxford University Press. A graduate of Harvard Law School, Professor Bosco worked previously as a private attorney and on refugee issues in the Balkans. He is currently researching a book on ocean governance and the law of the sea.

Pete Buttigieg is the mayor of South Bend, Indiana’s fourth-largest city. A Rhodes Scholar, he holds degrees from Oxford and Harvard Universities. He was the Democratic nominee for Indiana State Treasurer in 2010 against incumbent Richard Mourdock. Previously he was a management consultant at McKinsey & Company where he worked in energy, retail, economic development, and logistics. Elected in 2011 at the age of 29, he is one of America’s youngest mayors of a city with over 100,000 residents. He is president of the Indiana Urban Mayors Caucus and serves on the board of the Truman National Security Project. A lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Reserve, he spent most of 2014 was on leave from the office while deployed to Afghanistan.

Roger Cohen is a Pulitzer Prize-nominated columnist on international affairs and diplomacy for The New York Times and the International New York Times. He joined the Times in 1990 after 10 years as a journalist for The Wall Street Journal and Reuters. He was a Times foreign correspondent for more than a decade before becoming acting foreign editor on Sept. 11, 2001, the day of the 9/11 attacks, and foreign editor six months later. He became an op-ed columnist in 2009. His work has taken him to many countries, including Bosnia, Iran, Israel and Afghanistan. His retrospective book about his Balkan experiences, Hearts Grown Brutal: Sagas of Sarajevo (Random House, 1998) won a citation for excellence from the Overseas Press Club. His most recent book is an acclaimed family memoir, The Girl from Human Street: A Jewish Family Odyssey.

Deborah Cohn is professor of Spanish at Indiana University, Bloomington. She specializes in the Cold War, focusing in particular on: U.S. cultural diplomacy; how U.S. universities functioned as vehicles for soft power in U.S. efforts to win “hearts and minds” around the world; and Latin American-U.S. literary and cultural relations. Her research on William Faulkner’s tours as goodwill ambassador for the U.S. Department of State has been published in Diplomatic History and other sources. She is the author of The Latin American Literary Boom and U.S. Nationalism during the Cold War (Vanderbilt UP, 2012), History and Memory in the Two Souths: Recent Southern and Spanish American Fiction (Vanderbilt UP, 1999), as well as coeditor, with Jon Smith, of Look Away! The U.S. South in New World Studies (Duke UP, 2004). Her research has been supported by fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Rockefeller Archive Center, and the American Philosophical Society

Aurelian Craiutu is Professor in the Department of Political Science at Indiana University, Bloomington, where he teaches courses in political theory and the history of political thought. He has written and edited several books on modern French political thought, most recently Faces of Moderation: The Art of Balance in an age of Extremes (Penn Press, 2016), A Virtue for Courageous Minds: Moderation in French Political Thought (Princeton UP, 2012) and (with Jeremy Jennings) Tocqueville on America after 1840: Letters and Other Writings (Cambridge UP, 2009).

Nick Cullather is a professor of history and international studies, and Executive Associate Dean of SGIS. He is a historian of U.S. foreign relations, specializing in the history of intelligence, development, and nation-building. In August 2014, Cullather began serving as co-editor of the journal Diplomatic History, the journal of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. He is the author of The Hungry World: America’s Cold War Battle Against Poverty in Asia (2010), which won the Ellis Hawley Prize for economic history, the Robert Ferrell Prize in diplomatic history, and was shortlisted for the Lionel Gelber Prize for the best book on a global policy issue. Cullather has won Fulbright grants to the Philippines and Singapore. Cullather earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Indiana University and a doctorate from the University of Virginia.

Ivo H. Daalder is president of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Prior to joining the Council, he served as the Ambassador to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization for more than four years, appointed by President Obama in 2009. Before that, Daalder was a Senior Fellow in foreign policy studies at the Brookings Institution, specializing in American foreign policy, European security and transatlantic relations, and national security affairs. He served on the National Security Council staff as director for European Affairs from 1995-97. Daalder serves on the board of UI LABS, on the leadership board of the chancellor of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and on the Advisory Committee of the Secretary of State’s Strategic Dialogue with Civil Society, for which he also co-chairs the Global Cities Working Group. His most recent books include In the Shadow of the Oval Office: Profiles of the National Security Advisers and the Presidents they Served—From JFK to George W. Bush (with I. M. Destler) and the award-winning America Unbound: The Bush Revolution in Foreign Policy (with James M. Lindsay). Daalder is a frequent contributor to the opinion pages of the world’s leading newspapers, and a regular commentator on international affairs on television and radio.

E.J. Dionne Jr. grew up in Fall River, Massachusetts. He attended Catholic schools, graduated from Harvard University, and received a D.Phil. in sociology from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. In 1975, he went to work for The New York Times covering state, local, and national politics and also serving as a foreign correspondent. He reported from more than two dozen countries, including extended periods in Paris, Rome, and Beirut. He joined The Washington Post in 1990 as a political reporter and has been writing a column for the Post since 1993, which appears in more than 240 newspapers. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and University Professor in the Foundations of Democracy and Culture at Georgetown University, where he teaches in the McCourt School of Public Policy and the Government Department. Dionne analyzes politics weekly on NPR’s All Things Considered and is a regular analyst for MSNBC and This Week on ABC News. He is the author of Why Americans Hate Politics (Los Angeles Times Book Prize and National Book Award nominee). His most recent book, Why the Right Went Wrong: Conservatism – From Goldwater to Trump and Beyond, was published in 2016. In 2017, Bloomsbury published We Are The Change We Seek, a collection of President Obama’s speeches that he edited with Joy-Ann Reid of MSNBC.

Evan A. Feigenbaum is Vice Chairman of the Paulson Institute, an independent center, located at the University of Chicago, established by former U.S. Treasury Secretary and Goldman Sachs CEO Hank Paulson. He is also Nonresident Senior Fellow in the Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. From 2001 to 2009, he served at the U.S. State Department as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for South Asia, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Central Asia, Member of the Policy Planning Staff with principal responsibility for East Asia and the Pacific under Secretaries of State Colin L. Powell and Condoleezza Rice, and as an adviser on China to Deputy Secretary of State Robert B. Zoellick, with whom he worked closely in the development of the U.S.-China senior dialogue. Feigenbaum has been Head of the Asia practice group at Eurasia Group, Senior Fellow for Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations, and taught at Harvard University and the U.S .Naval Postgraduate School. Feigenbaum holds a PhD in Chinese politics from Stanford University and is the author of three books and monographs, including most recently The United States in the New Asia, and China’s Techno-Warriors, which was selected by Foreign Affairs as a best book of 2003 on the Asia-Pacific, as well as numerous essays.

Emma Gilligan is Associate Professor in the School of Global and International Studies, Indiana University. After completing her doctoral studies in Russian history at the University of Melbourne, Australia, Gilligan was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of History at the University of Chicago from 2003-2006. Her first book, Defending Human Rights in Russia; Sergei Kovalyov Dissident and Human Rights Commissioner, 1969-96 (Routledge, 2004), traces the evolution of the Soviet human rights movement from the 1960s in Moscow to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. It analyzes, in particular, the rise of Sergei Kovalyov, Russia’s first human rights commissioner under the presidency of Boris Yeltsin and the impact of former Soviet dissidents on the discourse of human rights in the post-Soviet era. Her second book, Terror In Chechnya: Russia and the Tragedy of Civilians in War (Princeton University Press, 2010) examines the war crimes committed by Russian soldiers against the civilian population of Chechnya. The study places the conflict in Chechnya within the international discourse on humanitarian intervention in the 1990s and the rise of nationalism in Russia. Emma Gilligan is the author of articles for the Chicago Tribune, and the International Herald Tribune. She has appeared on MSNBC, Al Jazeera and Radio Liberty.

John Hamilton was elected Mayor of Bloomington in 2015. He is focused on improving the economy – helping it become more equitable, so Bloomington works for people from all walks of life; more sustainable, so we are building a better future with today’s efforts; and more productive, so we can help build value for all to share. A Bloomington native, Hamilton grew up the son of a Methodist minister and a professional musician. He graduated from Harvard College and Indiana University Maurer School of Law, then had a distinguished career primarily in the public and nonprofit sectors, focused on increasing economic justice and opportunity, social and health services, civil rights, and environmental stewardship. Hamilton founded City First Bank of D.C. (City First), a certified Community Development Financial Institution dedicated to strengthening low-to-moderate-income communities. As the Secretary of the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, he oversaw Indiana’s social safety net and a staff of 10,000 with an annual budget of $6 billion. He also protected our air, water and land as Commissioner of the Indiana Department of Environmental Management and served as an elected member of the Board of Trustees for the Monroe County Community School Corporation.

Marie Harf is a national security communications and policy strategist who has held a variety of senior roles in government and politics since arriving in Washington over a decade ago. She currently serves as a Fox News contributor focused on national security and political analysis. Harf served as Senior Advisor for Strategic Communications (2015 to 2017) and the State Department’s Deputy Spokesperson (2013 to 2015). In 2013, she was the senior advisor to and press spokesperson for Chuck Hagel during his successful confirmation to be Secretary of Defense. During the 2012 election, Ms. Harf was Associate Policy Director responsible for all national security and foreign policy issues on President Barack Obama’s re-election campaign. Harf began her career in Washington in 2006 as an officer at the Central Intelligence Agency, first serving as an analyst on Middle East leadership issues in the Directorate of Intelligence and then as the Agency’s Media Spokesperson. Harf received her Master’s degree in Foreign Affairs from the University of Virginia, where her thesis evaluated the prospects for continued regime stability in Saudi Arabia. She graduated with honors from Indiana University, earning a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science with concentrations in Jewish Studies and Russian and East European Studies.

Mark Hertling served four decades in the US Army. Before retirement, he was Commanding General of US Army Europe, where he led over 50,000 soldiers and partnered with armies of 50 countries in Europe and the Levant. Hertling commanded the 1st Armored Division in combat in Northern Iraq in 2007-8, acted as Assistant Division Commander in Baghdad in 2003-4, and he commanded at both the Army’s National Training Center in California and the Joint Multi-National Training Center in Germany. Receiving a Bachelor of Science from West Point in 1975, LTG Hertling holds Masters’ Degrees in History, National Security Studies and Kinesiology (the latter from Indiana University’s School of Public Health). He is currently a Doctoral Candidate at the Crummer School, Rollins College. Mark’s military honors include Distinguished Service Medals, Legions of Merit, Bronze Stars, Purple Heart, and Army Commendation Medals for Valor. He received the German Gold Cross, the Romanian Land Forces Emblem of Honor, and the Polish Soldier’s Medal of Honor. Since retiring in 2013, Hertling is a SVP at the innovative Florida Hospital in Orlando. From 2013-2017. he was one of 25 members of the President’s Council on Fitness. He is an adjunct scholar at West Point’s Modern War Institute, and he serves as a military analyst for CNN. His book, Growing Physician Leaders, was published in May 2016.

Adam Hitchcock is a managing director at Guggenheim Partners. He is also a lecturer at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. Before joining Guggenheim, he served as the chief of staff of the White House Council of Economic Advisers. In this role, he managed the staff and operations of the Council and was the strategic adviser to the Council’s chairman on policy and politics. Prior to that, Adam served as a special assistant in the White House Office of the Chief of Staff, where he provided counsel and support to President Obama’s senior advisors. Before joining the Obama Administration, Adam was on the Obama-Biden White House Transition Project and the Obama 2008 presidential campaign. Previously, he worked for Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley. Adam is a fellow and member of the Board of Advisors at the Truman National Security Project, serves on the Studies Committee at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs and is a member of the Atlantic Council. He is on the board of Urban Initiatives, a nonprofit organization that runs health, education, and character development programming for kids in the Chicago Public Schools.

Eric Holcomb is the 51st Governor of Indiana. He was elected governor following an unprecedented 106-day campaign and was sworn in on January 9, 2017. Prior to his election as governor, he served as Indiana’s Lt. Governor. Holcomb is a veteran of the United States Navy and was a trusted advisor to both Governor Mitch Daniels and Senator Dan Coats. Throughout his career in public service, Eric has earned a reputation of being a consensus builder. He’s worked with Hoosiers from all walks of life to build support for a number of initiatives and is the author of the book, Leading the Revolution, which outlined the successes of the Mitch Daniels approach to campaigning and governing. Eric is a graduate of Pike High School in Indianapolis and Hanover College in southeastern Indiana where he majored in U.S. History with a focus on the Civil War and Reconstruction. A student of history, he is a collector of presidential signatures and currently has documents signed by 41 of our nation’s 44 presidents. A life-long Hoosier, Eric has traveled extensively throughout Indiana and has made a jump shot in each of the state’s 92 counties.

Feisal Istrabadi focuses his research on the processes of building legal and political institutions in countries in transition from dictatorship to democracy. Prior to his diplomatic appointment as Deputy Permanent Representative of Iraq to the United Nations, Istrabadi served as a legal advisor to the Iraqi Minister for Foreign Affairs during the negotiations for U.N. Security Council resolution 1546 of June 8, 2004, which recognized the reassertion by Iraq of its sovereignty. He was also principal legal drafter of Iraq’s interim constitution, the Law of Administration of the State of Iraq for the Transitional Period, and principal author of its Bill of Fundamental Rights. Before contributing to the reconstruction of Iraq, Istrabadi was a practicing trial lawyer in the United States for 15 years, with approximately 70 civil trials in federal and state courts, focusing on civil rights, employment discrimination, and constitutional torts. Istrabadi lectures often at universities and think tanks on Iraq-related issues and appears frequently in national and international media. He is the founding director of the Center for the Study of the Middle East at Indiana University.

Christopher A. Kojm served as Chairman of the National Intelligence Council from 2009 to 2014. In the Fall of 2014, he rejoined the Elliot School as Visiting Professor of the Practice of International Affairs. He was previously the Elliott School’s director of the mid-career MIPP program from 2008 to 2009 as well as the director of the U.S. Foreign Policy Summer Program (USFPSP) from 2007 to 2008. He also taught at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School (2004-07) and at Georgetown University (2005). In government, Chris served as a staffer on the House Foreign Affairs Committee from 1984-98 under Rep. Lee H. Hamilton, as a deputy assistant secretary of state in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research (1998-2003), and as Deputy Director of the 9/11 Commission (2003-04). He was president of the 9/11 Public Discourse Project, the Commission’s follow-on public education organization (2004-05) and served as a Senior Advisor to the Iraq Study Group (2006).

Adam Liff is Assistant Professor of East Asian International Relations at SGIS, Indiana University. His research focuses on international security and the Asia-Pacific, with particular emphasis on the foreign relations of Japan and China; U.S. Asia-Pacific strategy; the U.S.-Japan alliance, and the rise of China and its impact on its region and the world. Liff’s academic scholarship has been published in International Security, Journal of Contemporary China, Journal of Strategic Studies, Security Studies, The China Quarterly, and The Washington Quarterly, and has been cited widely in global media, including in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and The Economist. Since 2014, Liff is also associate-in-research at Harvard University’s Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies and Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. He holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in Politics from Princeton University, and a B.A. from Stanford University.

Tod Lindberg is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of The Heroic Heart: Greatness Ancient and Modern, The Political Teachings of Jesus and Means to an End: U.S. Interest in the International Criminal Court (with Lee Feinstein). He is editor of Beyond Paradise and Power: Europe, America, and the Future of a Troubled Partnership and Bridging the Foreign Policy Divide (with Derek Chollet and David Shorr). From 1999 to 2013, he was editor of Policy Review. He teaches Ethics and Decision-Making in International Politics at Indiana University’s School of Global and International Studies and a graduate seminar on the same subject at Georgetown University. He is co-author with Lee Feinstein of Allies against Atrocities: The Imperative for Transatlantic Cooperation to Prevent and Stop Mass Killings, a new report published by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Maria Lipman is the Editor of COUNTERPOINT, an online journal published by the Institute of European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (George Washington University); she is a Russian political analyst and commentator. Lipman was the editor-in-chief of Pro et Contra, a policy journal published by the Carnegie Moscow Center from 2003-2014. Before joining Carnegie Moscow Center, Lipman was co-founder and deputy editor of two Russian weekly magazines. From 2001-2011, Lipman wrote an op-ed column on Russian politics, media and society for The Washington Post. She has contributed to a variety of Russian and U.S. publications; since 2012, she has written a blog for The New Yorker online. She contributed to and co-edited several volumes on Russian politics and society, including The State of Russia: What Comes Next? (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015) and “How Putin Silences Dissent” (Foreign Affairs, May/June 2016) Lipman is a frequent speaker on the international conference circuit and has regularly featured as a Russia expert on a range of international broadcast media. She is currently a visiting lecturer at IU’s School of Global and International Studies.

Keith Luse is the Executive Director of The National Committee on North Korea. At the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, he served as the Senior East Asia Professional Staff Member for Chairman and later Ranking Member Senator Richard Lugar, from 2003 until 2013. He was Staff Director for Mr. Lugar at the Senate Agriculture Committee from 1999 through 2002, where the Senator also served as Chairman and later Ranking Member. For eight years during the 1990’s, Luse travelled extensively throughout Southeast Asia, conducting research for U.S. companies planning to penetrate the region’s markets. Earlier in his career, Luse was Senator Lugar’s State Director, followed by service as Chairman of the Indiana Republican Party. Upon departing the Senate in 2013, Luse was awarded the Philippine Legion of Honor Award by President Aquino for assisting Senator Lugar’s efforts to foster relations between the United States and the Philippines and Southeast Asia. He is a Co-Recipient of the 2010 Kato Ryozo Award for Service to the U.S.–Japan Alliance. In 2016, President Truong Tan Sang awarded Luse Vietnam’s Medal of Friendship for his contributions to normalization of U.S.–Vietnam relations. Luse has made five trips to North Korea. Luse was presented a Bachelor of Arts in political science from Indiana University. His graduate certificate in public management and additional graduate studies were obtained at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University–Purdue University, Indianapolis.

Michael A. McRobbie has served as president of Indiana University since 2007. He previously served as IU’s vice president for information technology and chief information officer, as vice president for research, and as interim provost and vice president for academic affairs for IU Bloomington. Under McRobbie’s leadership, IU has seen a major expansion in the size and quality of its student body, a reinvigoration of the global partnerships that support the university’s international academic programs, an extensive program of building with the renovation and construction of nearly 70 major new buildings with a total value approaching $2 billion, and a large-scale academic restructuring of the university, with the establishment or reconfiguration of eight new schools. A native of Australia, McRobbie received a Ph.D. from the Australian National University. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Blair Milo was first elected Mayor of La Porte, Indiana in 2011 and re-elected in 2015. Upon taking office, she focused her administration on building the most conducive climate for economic development growth, providing for sustainable infrastructure needs and fostering a community dedication toward positive lifestyle choices. Appointed by former Indiana Governor Mike Pence, Mayor Milo serves on the State Workforce Innovation Council and chairs the Career Counseling Task Force. She is a member of Governing Magazine’s Women in Government Leadership Series and serves on the Board of Directors for the National Association of Regional Councils; the Indiana Advisory Alliance for the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition; the Board of Directors for Accelerate Indiana’s Municipalities; and the Board of Governors for the Richard G. Lugar Excellence in Public Service Series. Prior to moving home to run for Mayor, Milo served as a Surface Warfare Officer in the U.S. Navy (2005-07), completing two Persian Gulf deployments. After serving in Bahrain and Iraq, Milo transferred to the Chief of Naval Operations staff at the Pentagon, and in July 2010, transitioned from active to reserve duty, where she holds the rank of Lieutenant Commander. Milo was born and raised in La Porte, Indiana. She earned a B. A. in Political Science at Purdue University and a commission as an Ensign in the United States Navy in 2004. In 2010, she earned a Master’s Degree in Legislative Affairs from the George Washington University.

Elaine Monaghan, a professor of practice in journalism and public relations at IU’s Media School, is a veteran reporter, writer and foreign correspondent. Born in Scotland, she is a graduate of Reuters’ journalism training program in London. For Reuters, she was based in Moscow, Kyiv/Minsk, Dublin/Belfast, and finally Washington, where she served as State Department correspondent during the tenures of Madeleine Albright and Colin Powell, traveling with them from 1999 to 2002. Monaghan later covered the Iraq invasion and other aspects of post-9/11 life for The Times of London as a Washington correspondent, served as foreign policy correspondent and magazine writer for Congressional Quarterly, and co-authored a CIA memoir. Notable experiences in her reporting life included Boris Yeltsin’s reelection campaign, President Alexander Lukashenko’s ascent to power, Dublin’s entry to European monetary union, Northern Ireland’s peace deal, Kosovo’s refugee crisis, and the impact of the September 11 attacks on the State Department and U.S. foreign and domestic policies. Her most exotic reporting trip took her on a rare trip to the Kurile Islands. Before coming to Bloomington in 2014, she spent two years working in strategic communications, notably as a consultant for Amnesty International USA.

James T. Morris is the Chair of the Indiana University Board of Trustees and is the Vice Chairman of Pacers Sports & Entertainment. A graduate of Indiana University with a master’s degree from Butler University, he was former Mayor Richard G. Lugar’s chief of staff from 1967-73, before joining the Lilly Endowment, serving as its president from 1984-88 and from 1989-2002. He was also the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer for IWC Resources Corporation and Indianapolis Water Company. Before going to PS&E, Trustee Morris was the Executive Director for the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) where he led the world’s largest humanitarian agency. Trustee Morris has received many honors, including 16 honorary degrees and IU’s Distinguished Alumni Service Award. He has been a trustee and board chairman for both Indiana State University and Indiana University, serves on the National Advisory Board for the Boy Scouts of America, and is treasurer of the U.S. Gymnastics Federation. He is chair of the Board for Riley Children’s Foundation, and serves on a number of corporate boards.

Christiana Ochoa is Professor of Law at the Maurer School of Law, Indiana University, and has focused the majority of her scholarship on the question of how economic activity intersects with human well-being. Before joining the faculty in 2003, she had worked at the global law firm, Clifford Chance, where she dedicated her efforts to cross-border capital markets and asset-finance transactions. She had also worked for a number of human rights and non-governmental organizations in Colombia, Brazil and Nicaragua. Together with her life-experience in Latin America, this work focused her attention on governance in the field of business and human rights. Since that time, her research on governance mechanisms has expanded into the field of law and development. Her scholarship in these areas has been published widely, and her first documentary film, “Otra Cosa No Hay/There is Nothing Else,” was completed in 2014. She is pursuing fieldwork toward the production of a second documentary, which will focus on law as a set of tools for the realization of differing views of development. She is associate director of the IU Center for Documentary Research and Practice, a center within The Media School that brings together scholars and artists from across the university who will work on an array of nonfiction media projects.

Lauren Robel was named provost of Indiana University Bloomington and executive vice president of Indiana University in 2012. She is the Val Nolan Professor of Law in the Maurer School of Law, where she served as Dean from 2002 to 2011 and as associate dean from 1991 to 2002. In fall 2013, Robel initiated a strategic planning process aimed at reimagining and invigorating academic programs across the Bloomington campus in anticipation of Indiana University’s Bicentennial in 2020. Robel’s Bicentennial Strategic Plan for Indiana University Bloomington includes ambitious initiatives for the Bloomington campus such as a new School of Art and Design, a new program in engineering, and the integration of health sciences programs into a new on-campus Academic Health Center. The plan also calls for initiatives to promote student and faculty success in a variety of areas, from financial literacy and career development to work-life balance and diversity recruitment. As the chief academic officer for the Bloomington campus, Robel oversaw the campuswide implementation of the 2011 New Academic Directions report. The recommendations outlined in the report led to the formation of several new schools and programs on the Bloomington campus, including The Media School, the School of Informatics and Computing, the School of Public Health, the School of Global and International Studies, the Integrated Program in the Environment, and the Office of Scholarly Publishing.

Tim Roemer is a strategic counselor at APCO Worldwide who works with clients on government relations. In 2009, he was appointed U.S. Ambassador to India, one of America’s largest diplomatic missions. During his time in office, Roemer helped move India from being America’s 25th largest trading partner to 12th. He strengthened U.S. cooperation with India in technology transfers and sales in the defense and space industries. Roemer was a member of the 9/11 Commission, and is one of the authors of the 9/11 Commission Final Report. He also served on the Washington Institute’s Presidential Task Force on Combating the Ideology of Radical Extremism; the 21st Century National Parks Commission; the Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism; and the 9/11 FBI Review Commission as well as several Blue Ribbon national panels. Earlier, Roemer proudly served for 12 years in the United States Congress as the Representative for Indiana’s 3rd Congressional District. He is currently a member of the Aspen Institute’s U.S.-India Strategic Dialogue, and the Center for American Policy’s U.S.-India 21st Century Institute. He is also a strategic adviser to Issue One, a non-profit organization working on a non-partisan basis to address the insidious impact of big money on American democracy. He is a lecturer at the Washington Campus Executive MBA Program where he speaks on national security, market entry, and the U.S.-India relationship. He completed his bachelor’s degree at the University of California at San Diego. He earned a master’s and a doctoral degree in American government from the University of Notre Dame.

Kori Schake is a research fellow at the Hoover Institution. She is the editor, with Jim Mattis, of the book Warriors and Citizens: American Views of Our Military. She teaches Thinking About War at Stanford, is a columnist for Foreign Policy magazine, and a contributor to War on the Rocks. Her history of the Anglo-American hegemonic transition is forthcoming (2017) from Harvard University Press. She has served in various policy roles including at the White House for the National Security Council; at the Department of Defense for the Office of the Secretary and Joint Chiefs of Staff and the State Department for the Policy Planning Staff. During the 2008 presidential election, she was Senior Policy Advisor on the McCain-Palin campaign. She has been profiled in publications ranging from national news to popular culture including the Los Angeles Times, Politico, and Vogue Magazine. Her recent publications include: “Republican Foreign Policy After Trump” (Survival, Fall 2016), “National Security Challenges for the Next President” (Orbis, Winter 2017), “Will Washington Abandon the Order?” (Foreign Affairs, Jan/Feb 2017).

Ron Sela is Associate Professor of Central Eurasian and International Studies at Indiana University’s School of Global and International Studies, where he also serves as Director of the Islamic Studies Program. He has published books and articles on the history and historiography of Muslim societies, particularly in Central Asia, with forays into South Asia and the Middle East, using original narrative and documentary sources in diverse languages (incl. Persian, Arabic, Turkic, Hebrew, Russian, etc.). Recently, he has been leading an international initiative to study the crisis of religious authority in the Muslim world.

Wendy R. Sherman is Senior Counselor at Albright Stonebridge Group and former Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs. She is a Senior Fellow at Harvard’s Belfer Center, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations as well as the Aspen Strategy Group. Ambassador Sherman led the U.S. negotiating team that reached agreement on a Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between the P5+1, the European Union, and Iran for which, among other diplomatic accomplishments, she was awarded the National Security Medal by President Barack Obama. Prior to her service at the Department of State, she was Vice Chair and founding partner of the Albright Stonebridge Group, Counselor of the Department of State under Secretary Madeleine Albright and Special Advisor to President Clinton and Policy Coordinator on North Korea, and Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs under Secretary Warren Christopher. Early in her career, she managed Senator Barbara Mikulski’s successful campaign for the U.S. Senate and served as Director of EMILY’S list. Ambassador Sherman served on the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board, was Chair of the Board of Directors of Oxfam America and served on the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Policy Board and Congressional Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction, Proliferation and Terrorism.

Steven Simon is John J. McCloy ’16 Visiting Professor in History at Amherst College. He previously served on the NSC during the Clinton and Obama administrations and in a range of posts at the Department of State. In addition, he has been Goldman Sachs & Co. Visiting Professor at Princeton University, Hasib Sabbagh Senior Fellow in Middle Eastern Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, University Fellow in History of Religion at Brown University, International Affairs Fellow at Nuffield College Oxford, Bosch Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin, visiting lecturer at Dartmouth College, Executive Director of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in the US and Middle East, and senior analyst at the RAND Corporation. His first book, The Age of Sacred Terror, co-authored with Daniel Benjamin, won CFR’s Arthur Ross award for best book on international affairs. His new book, The Long Goodbye: The United States and the Middle East from Islamic Revolution to the Arab Spring (Penguin Random House), will be released in early 2019.

Mireya Solís is a senior fellow and the Philip Knight Chair in Japan Studies at the Brookings Institution’s Center for East Asia Policy Studies. An expert in Japan’s foreign economic policies, Solís earned a Ph.D. in government and an M.A. in East Asian studies from Harvard University, and a B.A. in international relations from El Colegio de México. Her main research interests include Japanese politics, political economy, and foreign policy; international and comparative political economy; International Relations; and government-business relations. She also has interests in broader issues in U.S.-Japan relations and East Asian multilateralism. She has written and co-edited several books on trade in Japan and East Asia, including Dilemmas of a Trading Nation: Japan and the United States in the Evolving Asia-Pacific Order (Brookings Press, forthcoming); Competitive Regionalism: FTA Diffusion in the Pacific Rim, with Barbara Stallings and Saori N. Katada (Palgrave Macmillan, 2009); Cross-Regional Trade Agreements: Understanding Permeated Regionalism in East Asia, with Saori N. Katada (Springer, 2008); and Banking on Multinationals: Public Credit and the Export of Japanese Sunset Industries (Stanford University Press, 2004). She has also published numerous articles and book chapters on implications of and responses to the recent economic crisis, Japan’s domestic politics and foreign and economic policies, and East Asian multilateralism.

Constanze Stelzenmüller is the inaugural Robert Bosch senior fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe at the Brookings Institution. Prior to working at Brookings, she was a senior transatlantic fellow with the German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF), where she directed the influential Transatlantic Trends survey program. Her areas of expertise include: transatlantic relations; German foreign policy; NATO; the European Union’s foreign, security, and defense policy; international law; and human rights. Stelzenmüller is the former director of GMF’s Berlin office. From 1994 to 2005, she was an editor for the political section of the German weekly DIE ZEIT. Stelzenmüller’s essays and articles, in both German and English, have appeared in a wide range of publications, including Foreign Affairs, Internationale Politik, the Financial Times, the International New York Times and Süddeutsche Zeitung. She is also a frequent commentator on American and European radio and television, including Presseclub (ARD), National Public Radio, and the BBC. Stelzenmüller holds a doctorate in law from the University of Bonn (1992), a master’s degree in public administration from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (1988), and a law degree from the University of Bonn (1985).

Ray Takeyh is Hasib J. Sabbagh senior fellow for Middle East Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). His areas of specialization are Iran, political reform in the Middle East, and Islamist movements and parties. Prior to joining CFR, Takeyh was senior advisor on Iran at the Department of State. He was previously a fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Takeyh is the coauthor of The Pragmatic Superpower: Winning the Cold War in the Middle East and is the author of three previous books, Guardians of the Revolution: Iran and the World in the Age of the Ayatollahs, Hidden Iran: Paradox and Power in the Islamic Republic, and The Origins of the Eisenhower Doctrine: The US, Britain and Nasser’s Egypt, 1953–1957. He has also written more than 250 articles and opinion pieces in many news outlets including Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. Takeyh has testified more than twenty times in various congressional committees and has appeared on PBS Newshour, Charlie Rose, ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN, BBC, FOX, and CSPAN. He has a doctorate in modern history from Oxford University.

Celeste Wallander is the CEO and Director of the The U.S. Russia Foundation for Economic Advancement and the Rule of Law (USRF). Previously, she has served as Special Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs and Senior Director for Russia and Central Asia on the National Security Council Staff. Prior to joining the NSC Staff, she was the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Russia/Ukraine/ Eurasia in the Office of International Security Affairs (ISA) from May 2009 to July 2012. An accomplished and recognized scholar on security relations in Europe and Eurasia, Wallander is the author of over 80 scholarly and public interest publications on these and related topics. Before joining government, Dr. Wallander was a professor in the School of International Service at American University and director of the M.A. Program in Global Governance, Politics, and Security (2009-2013) and Transatlantic Fellow of the German Marshall Fund of the United States (2012-2013). She has testified before Congress, lectured extensively in the U.S. and abroad, and served as a media analyst. Wallander received her Ph.D. (1990), M.Phil. (1986) and M.A. (1985) degrees in political science from Yale University, and her B.A. (1983 – summa cum laude) in political science from Northwestern University. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Atlantic Council of the United States, and the International Institute for Strategic Studies.

John Yasuda is Assistant Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Indiana University’s School of Global and International Studies. He specializes in contemporary Chinese politics. He has published articles in the Journal of Politics, Regulation & Governance, and The China Quarterly. His book, On Feeding the Masses, which examines the political roots of China’s food safety crisis, is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. Prior to joining SGIS, Yasuda was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for the Study of Contemporary China. He received his PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley, an MPhil in Comparative Government from Oxford University, and his BA in Government from Harvard University.

Pete Yonkman is president of Cook Group, Cook Medical, and Cook Inc. He joined Cook Inc.’s corporate counsel team in 2001 and was named vice president and chief corporate counsel of Cook Group in 2004. That same year, he took on the additional role of vice president for the company’s expanding operations in Asia. In 2005, Yonkman was named president of Cook’s urological device manufacturing facility in Spencer, IN. When he was named executive vice president of the core medical company’s ten clinical divisions in 2007, he took on global responsibility for a much broader scope of medical products. Each clinical division focuses on a treatment area, overall providing minimally invasive devices to over 40 medical specialties. In 2014, Yonkman was named president of Cook Medical. He was additionally named president of Cook Group and Cook Inc. in July of 2015. Currently, Yonkman serves on the Cleveland Clinic Heart & Vascular Institute Leadership Board and several boards at the Maurer School of Law: Intellectual Property Advisory Board, Fundraising and Strategic Planning, and Entrepreneurship Law Clinic Advisory Board. He received a bachelor’s degree in psychology and philosophy from Indiana University – Bloomington (Phi Beta Kappa) and a J.D. from the Maurer School of Law – Indiana University – Bloomington.

Philip Zelikow is the White Burkett Miller Professor of History at the University of Virginia. He has also served as the Dean leading the University’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. He was a career diplomat, posted overseas and in Washington, including service on the NSC staff for President George H.W. Bush. Since leaving government service in 1991 he has taught and directed research programs at Harvard University and at the University of Virginia, where he directed the Miller Center of Public Affairs from 1998 to 2005. In addition to service on government advisory boards and as an elected member of a local school board, he has taken two public service leaves from academia to return full-time to government service, in 2003-04 to direct the 9/11 Commission and in 2005-07 as Counselor of the Department of State, a deputy to Secretary Rice. He has been a member of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board for President Bush (2001-03) and for President Obama (2011-13). He has also been an adviser to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s program in global development.